We All We Got

We All We Got

Growing up, social issues were always brought up. Whether it was a political conversation or a conversation about past revolutionaries, it is something that stuck with me. Being a black girl in Denver who just happened to be a military brat, I wasn't faced with racism because I grew up in a diverse community. Fast forward to the move to North Carolina, where I was reminded every day that I was black. I had to understand quickly and go back on what I was taught to survive a "white world" that many did not want me a part of at all. Every time I would go out, I was looked at wrong, or people would just be overly friendly and in my face. Wanting to touch my hair or consistently berating me with "You're pretty for a black girl" or being asked continuously by my white friends if I was all the way black. 

As a black woman, my story is not unique. So many of us go through experiences like the ones I described. We go through being fearful for our lives and the lives of our loved ones. We are generational holders of the PTSD that were caused ancestrally, and we are forced to try to navigate that hurt along with the blow of watching our own die in front of us. We have too many hashtags, too many injustices, and like you all, I am tired. I want to see us prosper grow and live, but to do that, we must take back what is ours and build our own.

We have to become more organized, more strategic. We must build up our own neighborhoods and make sure we are in constant support of our black-owned businesses and black creatives. We must begin building our generational wealth through property, stock, and bonds. We must become a moving force so that our kids' kids will have the needed tools to carry on and keep things going.

To all my fellow black business, black creatives, and the protesters, I stand with you and in support of you. We Gonna Be Alright!